Golden Eagle AF-52 - History

Golden Eagle AF-52 - History


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Golden Eagle

(T-AF-52: dp. 6,319 (It.); 1.459'; b. 63; dr. 26'; s. 15 k.;
cpl. 64; a. none; T. C2-S-B1 (R) )

Golden Eagle (T-AF-52) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract 8 December 1941 by Moore Dry Dock Co., Oakland, Calif., launched 15 March 1942; sponsored by Mrs. John B. Mckee, and delivered to WSA 23 April 1943. As a merchant ship, she operated under charter to United Fruit Co. from 1944 to 1946 and to United States Lines from 1947 to 1948. Transferred from the Maritime Commission, she was acquired by the Navy 1 March 1950 and assigned to MSTS.

Manned by a civilian crew, Golden Eagle operated out of New York, carrying supplies to American bases in the North Atlantic, Europe, and the Mediterranean. During November and December 1950 she deployed to the Mediterranean for provisioning operations, and during the first 6 months of 1951 she transported cargo to Bremerhaven and Liverpool. Following a second deployment to the Mediterranean, she departed New York 3 August for logistics duty off Thule, Greenland. Returning to New York 13 September, she resumed transatlantic service the 19th. While steaming to Liverpool 2 January 1952, she participated in the rescue of seamen from the stricken merchant ship Flying Dutchman.

Between 1952 and 1961 Golden Eagle maintained a constant schedule of runs to ports in Western Europe. Operating out of New York, Boston, Baltimore, and Norfolk, she steamed to Bremerhaven, Liverpool, and Rotterdam. During August and September of 1952 and 1953 she supplied ships participating in Operation "Blue Jay" at Thule, and cargo runs in the North Atlantic have sent her to Newfoundland, Iceland, and Baffin Island. In addition to provisioning and cargo duties, she carried sealed atomic wastes from Bremerhaven and disposed of the material in the mid-Atlantic while returning to the East Coast.

After returning to New York 10 August 1961, Golden Eagle entered New York Navy Yard 14 August. Renamed Arcturus 18 October, she commissioned 18 November, Captain M. B. Davis in command. After shakedown in the Caribbean, she departed her homeport, Norfolk, for the Mediterranean in June 1962. While deployed with the 6th Fleet, she provisioned 51 ships, both at sea and in Spanish and Italian ports. She returned to the Mediterranean in December; and between 1963 and 1965 she has deployed six times to replenish ships of the 6th Fleet.

When not operating in the Mediterranean, Arcturus has supported exercises in the Atlantic and the Caribbean. During February 1966 she provisioned ships during Operation "Springboard" in the Caribbean. After deploying to the Mediterranean in April, she steamed to the northwestern coast of Europe and touched ports in Holland Germany, and Denmark during June. Two months later she departed Norfolk on her 10th deployment to the Mediterranean. At present she continues to support the mighty 6th Fleet and provides valuable aid for the continuing struggle to defend the cause of freedom in that troubled part of the world.


KAI T-50 Golden Eagle

The KAI T-50 Golden Eagle is a family of South Korean supersonic advanced trainers and multirole light fighters, developed by Korea Aerospace Industries with Lockheed Martin. The T-50 is South Korea's first indigenous supersonic aircraft and one of the world's few supersonic trainers. Δ] Development began in the late 1990s, and its maiden flight occurred in 2002. The aircraft entered active service with the Republic of Korea Air Force in 2005.

The T-50 has been further developed into aerobatic and combat variants, namely T-50B, TA-50, and FA-50. The F-50 is another advanced fighter variant being considered. The T-50B serves with the South Korean air force's aerobatics team. The TA-50 light attack variant has been ordered by Indonesia. Additional export orders are being pursued by Iraq, Poland, and Spain. Ε] The Philippines has begun contract negotiations to order the FA-50 variant. The T-50 is also being marketed as a candidate for the United States Air Force's next-generation T-X trainer programme. Ζ]


Su-47 development details

The Su-47 was introduced in January 2000 and completed the first stage of flight trials in December 2001.

In May 2002, Sukhoi was selected as prime contractor for the next-generation Russian PAK FA fighter programme. The PAK FA fighter aircraft is a development of the Su-47 but without the forward-swept wings. The first flight test of the PAK FA fighter aircraft was completed on 29 January 2010.

The design of the very high manoeuvrability prototype is based on the avionics and aerodynamics technologies developed for the Su-27 upgrade programme.

The aircraft did not enter full production and the sole aircraft served as a technology demonstrator. It serves as a base for the development of Su-57, a fifth-generation supersonic stealth fighter.

Su-47 Berkut was exhibited at the International Aviation and Space Salon MAKS-2019 show held at Zhukovsky International Airport, Moscow, in August 2019.


Golden Eagle Mine

The Golden Eagle Mine is a gold mine located in Yavapai county, Arizona at an elevation of 5,600 feet.

About the MRDS Data:

All mine locations were obtained from the USGS Mineral Resources Data System. The locations and other information in this database have not been verified for accuracy. It should be assumed that all mines are on private property.

Mine Info

Name: Golden Eagle Mine

Elevation: 5,600 Feet (1,707 Meters)

Primary Mineral: Gold

Lat, Long: 34.38889, -112.47972

Mine Description

The Golden Eagle property of eight claims, held by C. M. Zander and R. M. Hansen, is on a branch of Slate Creek, in the western portion of the Bradshaw Mountains. By road, it is 5 miles from the Senator Highway and from Prescott.

Part of this ground was located in 1880. Developments consist of about 2,000 feet of tunnels and two 100-foot shafts. Surface equipment includes a power plant and a 25-ton concentrator, equipped with a ball mill, amalgamation plates, and a table. The U. S. Mineral Resources state that a small production was made by the property in 1925 and 1926.

Here, the rock is Yavapai schist, intruded on the east by a mass of diorite. As most of the surface is covered by dense brush, surface exposures are poor. Work has been done on several veins which generally strike northeastward and dip nearly vertically SE. They typically consist of small lenses and scattered bunches of grayish-white quartz in shear zones. In places, the quartz contains small irregular masses and disseminations of pyrite and chalcopyrite. The gold occurs both in the sulphides, particularly the chalcopyrite, and in fractures in the quartz.

Text from Arizona Lode Gold Mines and Gold Mining, Arizona Bureau of Mines. Original 1934, revised 1967


Golden Eagles

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Buzzard


Buzzard

Golden eagle having a discussion with Red fox


Golden eagle having a discussion with Red fox

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Two Golden Eagles fighting over dead Red Fox


Two Golden Eagles fighting over dead Red Fox

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Looking into the darkness


Looking into the darkness

Angry Golden Eagle


Angry Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Golden Eyes


Golden Eyes

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Golen Eagle – Soaring High


Golen Eagle – Soaring High

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)


Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle Photo


Golden Eagle Photo

Cocky Attitude


Cocky Attitude

Golden Beauty


Golden Beauty

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

King Arthur


King Arthur

Golden Eagle surveys his domain


Golden Eagle surveys his domain

Golden Eagle


Golden Eagle

In snowstorm


In snowstorm


Golden Eagle AF-52 - History

Golden Eagle Log & Timber Homes is a family business that grew from a successful building supply company to a premier log and timber home manufacturer. In 1966, Wally and Marlace Parmeter founded Golden Eagle Building Center in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. With the knowledge that they obtained from building conventionally-framed homes and an in-depth understanding of the building products industry, the Parmeters decided to pursue their dream of building a log home, in which to raise their family.

The Parmeter family individually selected trees from their personal property and carefully cut and dried the logs to their preference. After a year of careful preparation, the Parmeters began construction on their log home. The construction did not go unnoticed by on-lookers. The Parmeter family was approached by many people who were impressed by the quality craftsmanship and beauty of the log home. The dream of living in a log home led to a new arm of the business: providing custom log and timber home packages.

Wally and Marlace's sons, Tod and Jay Parmeter, ran the thriving building center throughout the day and manufactured log and timber homes long into the night. During this time, the company-wide "board meetings" consisted of the Parmeter family sitting at a picnic table outside their own log home. The Parmeter family's dedication and love for creating log and timber homes was the reason that the sales from these log and timber homes quickly surpassed the sales from the building center.

In 1986, Wally and Marlace decided to expand the home production side of their business by officially founding Golden Eagle Log and Timber Homes. Tod and Jay cleared more land, built larger shops, tripled their log inventory, and installed new machinery. These steps were deemed necessary to provide the clientele with greater options, superior quality, and quicker manufacturing times.

A Second Generation of Craftsmen

In 1996, Wally and Marlace retired and left their business in the more-than-capable hands of their sons, Tod and Jay. To this day, Tod and Jay continue to prove their passion for log and timber homes by providing exceptional customer service and superior quality homes at fair and affordable prices.

Golden Eagle Log & Timber Homes limits the production to 100 log, timber, and custom homes per year. This ensures that each homeowner receives the care and top-quality personal service that they deserve. With over 5,000 homes sold since 1966 (fifty-five years ago), Golden Eagle Log and Timber Homes' success comes from a dedicated group of people who are devoted to the time-honored tradition of quality workmanship.

The Parmeters are a hardworking family who believes in the Golden Rule: "Treat others as you want to be treated." Please accept our personal invitation to call us 1-800-270-5025 toll-free or, better yet, visit our professionally decorated model home, our showroom, and tour our world class manufacturing facility. We will take the time to show you the difference in quality, craftsmanship, and customer service in comparison to our outside competitors.


Ecological Services

The Mountain-Prairie Region's Office of Ecological Services (ES) works to restore and protect healthy populations of fish, wildlife, and plants and the environments upon which they depend. Using the best available science, ES personnel work with Federal, State, Tribal, local, and non-profit stakeholders, as well as private land owners, to avoid, minimize, and mitigate threats to our Nation's natural resources.


Golden Eagle

The Golden Eagle is a gold mine located in Baker county, Oregon at an elevation of 5,499 feet.

About the MRDS Data:

All mine locations were obtained from the USGS Mineral Resources Data System. The locations and other information in this database have not been verified for accuracy. It should be assumed that all mines are on private property.

Mine Info

Elevation: 5,499 Feet (1,676 Meters)

Primary Mineral: Gold

Lat, Long: 44.6958, -118.47670

Golden Eagle MRDS details

Site Name

Primary: Golden Eagle
Secondary: Golden Eagle Mine

Commodity

Location

State: Oregon
County: Baker

Land Status

Land ownership: Private

Holdings

Workings

Ownership

Production

Deposit

Record Type: Site
Operation Category: Past Producer
Operation Type: Underground
Mining Method: Unknown
Years of Production:
Organization:
Significant: N

Physiography

General Physiographic Area: Intermontane Plateaus
Physiographic Province: Columbia Plateau
Physiographic Section: Blue Mountain Section


Golden Eagle

Scotland is fortunate in having over 400 pairs of golden eagles and many experienced, skilled and enthusiastic fieldworkers dedicated to their study. There are marked differences in the abundance of territorial pairs across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and in the species’ conservation status across regions. In the west, densities can be relatively high and most potential territories are occupied, and breeding productivity can be good, although in parts there is probably a shortage of live prey and few young are produced, which may be due to a history of overly extractive land use. In the Western Isles numbers have been expanding for several years.

By contrast, across large swathes of the central and eastern Highlands many historical territories have remained unoccupied for many years. Those territories that are occupied, however, are some of the most productive in Scotland, and so for many years have routinely produced many young eagles. On this basis, there should be many potential recruits to fill the large number of unoccupied territories, and the eastern and central Highlands of Scotland should be full of territorial golden eagles or, at least, the trend should be that an increasing number of vacant territories are being filled. Neither expectation has been apparent or realised according to national survey and SRSG observational efforts. The continued presence of numerous vacant territories cannot be explained by a shortage of fledged young eagles. The explanation must be because in these parts of the Highlands eagles are not surviving as long as elsewhere.

Detailed analyses have considered many possible reasons for this poor survival in the central and eastern Highlands and the overriding explanation, from many strands of evidence, is that it is due to illegal persecution of eagles and this persecution is concentrated in areas managed for driven grouse shoots. In essence, eagle survival is poor and so occupied territories are thin on the ground because eagles are probably being killed by humans, and most of this persecution probably has basis in the management of grouse moor.

There are very few territories south of the Central Belt, and a relatively high number of records of eagles being killed will certainly not be helping an expansion into unoccupied habitat. The potential for recruitment from the Highlands may be low as the lowlands may act as a barrier to dispersal and, with the southern Highlands not being at carrying capacity, the pressure to overcome the lowland barrier may be low. Arran and Kintyre may be the best source of recruits away from the Southern Uplands. The Minch, an area of sea between the mainland and the Western Isles, probably also acts as a barrier to dispersal. Golden eagles in the Western Isles are slightly different genetically to those on the mainland, being less diverse. It seems likely that the Minch is an obstacle to mixing of populations, and the current Western Isles population probably largely originated from a small number of pairs that survived in deer forests of Lewis and Harris during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

In the absence of any interference by humans, golden eagles are typically long-lived (20 years is a reasonable expectation for a mature adult) and have a relatively low breeding output, with a maximum of two fledglings produced per year. Breeding activity starts in late winter with attention on nest building. Eggs are laid in spring and after about six weeks of incubation, chicks can hatch. After about a further ten weeks the young may leave the nest and take their first fledgling flights.

Like other large raptors, golden eagles have a period of several years between fledging and settling to breed: probably around four to five years is typical, although in areas where birds are persecuted they can attempt to breed when still in subadult plumage because there is less competition from adults. During the period between fledging and settling to breed, young birds disperse away from their parents’ territory and can explore widely. Recent satellite tagging studies of the dispersal of fledgling eagles in Scotland have shown that young birds can be very different in when they leave their parents’ territory and go out ‘on their own’. Some leave after a period of a few short weeks after fledging, while others can stay put for many months – up to the time when their parents are becoming active in their next breeding attempt. Some young birds disperse with no prior exploration of the world beyond their parents’ territory – others make repeated excursions away from their parents’ territory before they finally go it alone.

Once dispersed, some young eagles can roam over hundreds of kilometres, taking them well beyond their home ground, while others do not move far. Several periodically return to their parents’ territory. Some young eagles, fledged in areas where they are probably relatively safe from human persecution, disperse into areas where the threat of persecution is more likely. Such areas are probably attractive to young dispersing eagles, because they have abundant food supplies and (apparently through persecution) a low density of territorial pairs. These attractive areas, but that carry an increased risk of being killed, can create a ‘black hole’ for young eagles originating in ‘safe areas’, spreading the population effects of persecution across a wider area than it occurs.

The golden eagle is a generalist predator, and part-time scavenger, gathering most of its food in open habitats where hunting birds can fly unimpeded. In many areas scavenging on carcasses of sheep and red deer probably sustains eagles through the winter. A variety of live food sources are exploited, from the size of a nestling meadow pipit up to a red deer calf, and from a seabird on the coast of the west, to a mountain hare in the mountains of the east.

Golden eagles can depredate smaller raptors, given the opportunity, but the relationship with white-tailed eagles is probably one of ‘armed neutrality’. While there are a few examples of birds of each species killing birds of the other species, and of nest sites changing between species, there is no systematic evidence that the rapid expansion of white-tailed eagles is having an adverse effect on golden eagles. Golden eagles are more likely to nest on higher altitude cliffs and take ‘terrestrial’ food, and white-tailed eagles are more likely to nest at lower altitude (more often in trees) and take ‘aquatic’ food. While there is some overlap in the two species’ ‘niches’ (several pairs of golden eagles nest on sea cliffs in the west and take seabirds, more typical of white-tailed eagles) but historical studies indicate that sea cliffs were used by golden eagles in the past, before white-tailed eagles were made extinct. The current relationship between the two species in Scotland appears similar to that in other countries, such as Norway, and in Scotland in the past.

Territorial golden eagles in Scotland are often not the traditionalist birds as portrayed in some populist media. While it seems that they are usually faithful to their mate over many years, DNA studies suggest that ‘divorce’ may occur, albeit rarely. Traditional nest sites can be used repeatedly over decades, but changing nest sites and creating new nest sites can be common. This has implications for surveyors looking to find active nest sites. Shifting and creating nest sites is to be expected given that new birds occupying a territory may have different preferences and as land use and sources of good food supplies can change, then golden eagles should react in the placement of nest sites to best exploit such change.

Although golden eagles are often considered one of the better-known Scottish raptors, there is still much to be learnt, especially on their behaviour. We still await signs that the biggest threat facing Scottish golden eagles, persecution, is disappearing those signs being their restoration to the large numbers of unoccupied territories in the eastern and central Highlands. The efforts of the SRSG will no doubt be critical in seeking such signs as they have been fundamental to almost every scientific publication on Scottish golden eagles in recent years.

Phil Whitfield

Crane, K. and Nellist, K. (1999). Island Eagles – 20 years observing Golden Eagles on the Isle of Skye. Cartwheeling Press, Skye.

Eaton, M.A., Dillon, I.A., Stirling-Aird, P. and Whitfield, D.P. (2007). Status of the Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos in Britain in 2003. Bird Study 54: 212-220.

Evans, R.J., Pearce-Higgins, J., Whitfield, D.P., Grant, J.R., MacLennan, A.M. and Reid, R. (2010). Comparative nest site characteristics of sympatric White-tailed Haliaeetus albicilla and Golden Eagles Aquila chrysaetos in western Scotland. Bird Study 57: 473-482.

Evans, R.J., O’Toole, L. and Whitfield, D.P. (2012). The history of eagles in Britain and Ireland: an ecological review of place name and documentary evidence from the last 1500 years. Bird Study 59: 335-349.

Evans, R., Reid R. and Whitfield, P. (2013). Pre-First World War persistence of a Golden Eagle population in the Outer Hebrides. Scottish Birds 33: 34-36.

Fielding, A., Whitfield, D.P., McLeod, D.R.A., McGrady, M.J. and Haworth, P.F. (2003). Modelling the impact of land use change on Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). In Thompson, D.B.A., Redpath, S.M., Fielding, A.H., Marquiss, M. & Galbraith, C.A. (Eds.). Birds of Prey in a Changing Environment. The Stationery Office, Edinburgh. Pp. 323-340.

Fielding, A.H., Haworth, P.F., Morgan, D.H., Thompson, D.B.A. and Whitfield, D.P. (2003). The impact of golden eagles on a diverse bird of prey assemblage. In Thompson, D.B.A., Redpath, S.M., Fielding, A.H., Marquiss, M., Galbraith, C.A. (Eds.). Birds of Prey in a Changing Environment. The Stationery Office, Edinburgh. Pp. 221-244.

Haworth, P.F., McGrady, M.J., Whitfield, D.P., Fielding, A.H. and McLeod, D.R.A. (2006). Ranging behaviour of golden eagles Aquila chrysaetos in western Scotland according to season and breeding status. Bird Study 53: 265-273.

Walker, D. (2009). Call of the Eagle. Whittles Publishing, Dunbeath, Caithness.

Watson, A., Payne, S. and Rae, R. (1989). Golden eagles Aquila chrysaetos: land use and food in northeast Scotland. Ibis 131: 336-348.

Watson, J. (2010). The Golden Eagle. 2nd Edition. Poyser, London.

Watson, J. and Whitfield, P. (2002). A conservation framework for the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos in Scotland. Journal of Raptor Research 36 (1 Supplement): 41-49.


Aquila chrysaetos (Linnaeus, 1758)

(Accipitridae Golden Eagle A. chrysaetos) L. aquila eagle ?< aquilus dark-coloured the Golden Eagle was the emblem of the Roman legions, whose standards or eagles bore the likeness of an eagle with raised wings "Aquila. Genus 9. . Genus Aquilinum . Digiti quatuor, membranis destituti tres scilicet antici, posticus unus omnes circiter usque ad exortum discreti: Crura ad calcaneum usque plumosa: Rostrum breve, primum rectum, dein aduncum ad basin cute nuda tectum: Caput plumosum. . **1. L'AIGLE . AQUILA." (Brisson 1760): based on "Aquila" of many previous authors "Aquila Brisson, Orn., 1, 1760, p. 28, 419. Type, by tautonymy, Aquila Brisson = Falco chrysaëtos Linné." (Peters, 1931, I, p. 253).
Var. Aquilla, Aquilo.
Synon. Aetos, Aetus, Afraetus, Cassinaetus, Chrysaetus, Euaquila, Micraetus, Morphnaetos, Psammoaetus, Pteroaetus, Taphaetus, Uroaetus.

L. aquila eagle ?< aquilus dark-coloured.
● "XIII. AIGLE COMMUN. FALCO AQUILA. . Aquila Valeria. ARISTOTE, Hist. anim. Falco fulvus. LINNÉ, Syst. nat. Chrysaëtos, cauda albo cincta. RAY, Syn. . En Tartarie on leur apprend à chasser les lièvres, les renards et même les loups" (Daudin 1800) (syn. Aquila chrysaetos).
● "66. PELECANUS. . Aquilus. 2. P. cauda forficata, corpore nigro, capite abdomineque albis. Am&oelign. acad. 4. p. . . Pelecanus Aquilus. Osb. iter. 292. Alcyon major pulla, cauda pulla, cauda longiore bifurca. Brown jam. 483. Cari pira Laët. amer. 575. Man of var.[sic] Sloan. jam. I. p. 30. Avis Rabo focardo. Pet. gaz. t. 45. f. 1.? Frigate bird. Alb. av. 3. p. 75. t. 80. male. Habitat in Insula Adscensionis aliisque pelagicis, vitam agens Diomedeæ exulis, cui similis." (Linnaeus 1758) from the very sharp, eagle-like bill of the Ascension Frigatebird (Fregata).

chrysaeta / chrysaetos Gr. χρυσαετος khrusaetos Golden Eagle < χρυσος khrusos gold αετος aetos eagle ex “Aquila chrysaëtos” of Willughby 1676, “Golden Eagle” of Ray 1713, and “Falco cera flava, pedibus lanatis, corpore fusco ferrugineo vario, cauda nigra basi cinereo-undulata” of Linnaeus 1746. This name, in the original combination Falco Chrysaetos Linnaeus, 1758, is the eighth name and sixth autochthonym in avian nomenclature (Aquila).


Watch the video: STORY of GOLDEN EAGLE And His PET in